Misleading Labels

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“These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.”

Every vitamin, mineral, herbal and botanical concoction sold without a prescription is a supplement.
This means, no assurances of quality, quantity, potency, or accuracy of any ingredients.

So, it is little surprise that many botanical supplements you may have tried or currently use may have misleading labels – Shocking!
Researchers at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, bough 44 single-ingredient herbal supplements manufactured by 12 different companies from stores in the Toronto area and through the mail from distributors in the United States. All the supplements were available in both countries.
Using A gene-testing technique called DNA bar-coding to identify plant species, the researchers found that 68% of the supplements contained a different botanical than the one listed on the label.

Worse still, 59% contained plant material not listed on the label and 9% contained only rice or wheat and none of the herbs listed on the label.
Adding insult to injury, one supplement labeled St. John’s Wort contained only senna, a laxative.
The researchers at the University of Guelph stated, “We suggest that the herbal industry should voluntarily embrace DNA bar-coding for authenticating herbal products.”

Just remember, when you reach for a supplement, you spin the roulette wheel with even less favorable odds of finding one that is useful or is correctly labeled.

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